Losing Your Contract – How to cope with it. What to do about your partner

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Losing Your Contract
Losing Your Contract

Losing Your Contract advice

It comes as a bit of a shock when first losing your contract. It is a big blow to your self esteem and you are sure to get feelings of rejection. By the way, it is OK to ‘grieve‘ over a job loss, but don‘t spend too long doing this. You need to take action and to take it quickly.

The first thing to do is to recognise the size of the problem.

Many people lose everything when they become unemployed. They lose their cars, their houses, their money, and, sad to say, often their partners and family as well.

So you have a lot to lose.

The fact is that, in this economic climate you have to look at the possibility that you may not work for six months, a year, or even longer.

Lifestyle Must Change

It is almost certainly the case that your lifestyle is way beyond what you can now afford.

Most people, when unemployment hits them, try to continue the lifestyle that they have. That’s until the money runs out totally. Then they have a real problem.

You basically have to work as hard as you can to get a new job whilst making plans to be able to survive for as long as possible till you get one.

If you have a partner, you have to sit down with them and explain the situation to them. Explain that losing your contract is happening to quite a lot of people. Tell them that many of those are out of work for a long time.

Explain that you need to take measures to ensure that the money doesn‘t run out before you are able to get new work. Say that you will work as hard as possible at getting a new job. However, you will have to make contingency plans.

The Fortunate With Real Life Partner

Those of you who are fortunate in your partners will have someone who sees themselves as a real life partner, and will be with you all the way, for richer or poorer. That’s as long as they see you making a genuine effort to rectify the situation. They will agree to take the necessary steps to reduce spending.

Those of you who are a little less fortunate will find that you will need to do a lot of convincing to get them to make such a sudden change to their lifestyle. They will demand that you cut back rather than they cut back. However, as long as you make an effort to get work, they‘ll probably stay on board.

Those of you who are much less fortunate will have a partner who finds all sorts of reasons why he or she cannot reign back very much spending at all. Of course, this will be the same type of partner who would be the first to bugger off when the money runs out.

You have to take the hard decisions whether he or she likes it or not. Otherwise the whole thing will blow up in your face, anyway, sooner rather than later.

Trying Hard to Get Job

Of course the most important thing is to pull yourself around, after a short period of grieving.

You have to show your partner that you are trying hard to get a job. If they see you doing that, then most will stay with you.

The very worst thing to do is to sink into a morass of misery and self-pity. So much so that you more or less give up or only make some half-hearted effort to get some work.

The next worst thing to do is to let your general appearance go a little, because you no longer have a routine in the morning before going to work. Try and fit your cleaning and personal hygiene into your new routine somehow.

If you start frequenting the pub much more often, then this will certainly not help.

Keep Trying to Get Contract Work

If your partner sees that you are trying, and you haven‘t let yourself go, then they will be far more likely to be sympathetic. If you do neither, then you are going to have real problems.

Tell your partner that you may need some morale boosting from time to time, when you are trying hard and getting no results.

Sometimes it is hard to go through the same routine every day, trying to get work, when there doesn‘t seem to be any success. However, you have to do it. Remember that all you may need is one shot – and that that opportunity may well be out there.

You can‘t catch fish without casting your rod or you‘re net into the water.

Losing your contract doesn’t have to be as stressful as it often is.

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